No Miami Is an Island


World without winter... Miami, FloridaNo man is an island, and, hopefully, Miami won't become an island, either. Those partial to belief in "sending good vibes" might want to send the climate change discussion at "Hopenhagen" an added dose of "hope."

The Wall Street Journal reports that tempers flared Monday in Copenhagen at the United Nations Climate Conference. A collection of poorer countries known as the "Group of 77" walked out in protest over what they called inadequate aid from rich, polluting countries such as the United States.

The "Group of 77" includes poor, developing countries as well as large-scale polluters such as Brazil, India, and China.

Meanwhile, Homeland Security Newswire (HSN) reports this week on dire consequences of rising sea levels in Florida. Consider the drastic effects a two-foot rise in sea level will have on Florida real estate...

States HSN:
Florida stands to lose almost 10 percent of its land area and the homes of 1.5 million people; the zone which is vulnerable to 27-inch rise in sea level includes residential real estate worth $130 billion, half of Florida's beaches, two nuclear reactors, three prisons, 37 nursing homes, and much more; the Florida government is considering changes to building codes and other precautionary measures.
Would, or could state or federal government fund levees or other structures protect large-population coastal cities? Doubt it, remember Katrina?

In Copenhagen a group developed countries, including the United States, are generally promising to reduce their emissions as well as contribute funds to help pay for cleanup in the developing world. However, tensions build as large unanswered questions remain concerning the emissions each country would cut and how much each country would contribute.

Discussions are critical because the WorldWatch Institute reports that "the Earth's ice cover is melting in more places and at higher rates than at any time since record keeping began." (March 6, 2000).

Miami, prepare for island real estate.
 

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