Rent Closer to Work, Save Your Job


perplexed nurseThink twice about the rental savings associated with living far away from your job: a long commute could cost you in more ways than one.

Nearly a dozen nurses are learning this the hard way after a Washington, D.C. hospital fired them for not showing up for work during the recent, history-making snowstorms, reports The Washington Post.

City living may actually be cheaper even with the less expensive rents outside the city core, if you include calculations for your commuting time and transit costs, as revealed by the Bay Area Burden.

Sympathy for the fired? Not really...



We're all responsible for where we choose to live and how accessible it is during an emergency. By definition, medical professionals and other, core employees who protect the community should prioritize a short commute and be paid so they can afford housing nearby.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing estimates that the nursing profession will be short 260,000 nursing jobs by 2025. Perhaps the nurses who were fired were too confident that the nationwide shortages would protect their jobs? The nurses are quoted as saying the move is "unfair and uncaring", but, as the hospital President Harry J. Rider maintains,
"Sadly, we did experience some issue with associates who did not show the same commitment as most of their co-workers to the community, our patients and their fellow associates. They are the few who turned away from their scheduled shifts and who tried -- and are still trying -- to turn the focus on themselves rather than the thousands of Washington Hospital Center workers who fulfilled their commitment to their patients and colleagues, and made it to work."
Let's assume that the nurses called off work due to the inability to commute rather than the less acceptable rational of wanting an unscheduled day off. They might consider their commuting distance to work for their next job. Sure, you can't control when roads will be cleared or public transit will be operational again, but, you can minimize these factors by living near work.

Prospective nurses filling these now-vacant jobs will benefit from a message board like this which gives a better idea of what D.C. neighborhood or adjacent location will minimize their commute to the hospital. Or, check our listings here at RentedSpaces and check addresses against a site like WalkScore.com.

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