Secrets to Getting Multiple Offers on a Home

stacks of coins  green and red...
ShutterstockDon't assume your home will get multiple offers.
By Brendon DiSimone

Homeowners hear that the real estate market has finally turned a corner and assume that means multiple offers and bidding wars are back. Even if your town is buzzing with real estate activity and sales are picking up, it doesn't mean that you're guaranteed multiple offers, or even one offer for that matter. For a seller to get lots of activity on their listing, there are three must-haves: location, price and presentation.

Must have a good location: One thing is common among all properties that receive multiple offers these days: the home is in a good location. Location is nearly always what drives homebuyers in their search. Before considering price, number of bedrooms or size of

Pricing isn't an exact science, and it's nearly impossible to pin a precise number to a home until buyer and seller sign a contract and close.

home, a buyer looks for location.

If your home is on a busy street, not in the best school district or near a freeway on/off ramp, chances are you won't receive the kind of activity that a well-located home would. In that case, work closely with your agent to price the home correctly.

Must be priced right: Buyers in any market look for perceived value. Homes priced 10 percent (or more) over their market value won't get noticed. Pricing isn't an exact science, and it's nearly impossible to pin a precise number to a home until buyer and seller sign a contract and close. Then, the price officially becomes the home's market value. Until that time, agents can provide sellers with a value range. Have a good location? Does your home show well? Are you in a strong sellers' market? Price your home on the bottom of that price range and you'll be sure to attract buyers -- and possibly multiple offers.

Must show well: A generation ago, sellers simply did some deep cleaning and maybe some de-cluttering before their first open house. Presentation wasn't as important then as it is today, given online listings. More buyers today develop an emotional connection to a home. They want to imagine themselves in your home and not feel like they're a guest. What does that mean? Appeal to the masses. If you have a good location and you plan to price your home realistically, then you need to make sure you give buyers what they want. If you can afford it, make cosmetic upgrades;

If you're not in a strong sellers' market or you spend a fortune on last-minute upgrades, you could be in for a giant surprise.

invest in some staging and work to turn your home into a "product." Emotionally disconnect from your home and try to see it more objectively.

Plan on having the home in perfect condition for the photo shoot. A buyer's first impression of your home likely will be via the Internet or an email from their agent. Make them want to step inside. The more buyers you attract to your home, the more activity.

Know your market: Don't assume that national trends apply to your region, city or neighborhood. If you're not in a strong sellers' market or you spend a fortune on last-minute upgrades, you could be in for a giant surprise. Just because you hear about bidding wars and multiple offers on the national news doesn't mean that applies to your market. For example, while properties in San Francisco may receive multiple offers, a town like Port Chester, NY, still sees short sales and homes often spend many days on the market.

Work with a good local agent. A local agent has likely toured all the nearby homes for sale as well as ones that have sold over the past six months to a year. Knowing those homes, having walked inside and personally knowing the agents who have sold them matters. This is market data that an outsider just doesn't have access to. This knowledge empowers good local agents to educate their sellers.

Brendon's practical real estate advice has appeared on FOX News, CNBC, USA Today, Bloomberg, FOX Business and Forbes. A licensed Realtor and an active investor himself, Brendon owns real estate around the U.S. and abroad and is licensed to sell in California and New York.

Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow or AOL.

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